Teton Valley - Must See - Must Do

Discover Teton Valley and all the activities and adventures

Teton Valley is filled with lots of activities, miles of trails, world-class trout water, and great proximity to 2 incredible National Parks. Make sure to pack the bikes when heading to Teton Valley because our integrated trail system make it easy to travel between Victor and Driggs.

Grand Teton National Park

Mountains of the Imagination

Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.

Animals

It seems that wildlife is never far away in Grand Teton National Park. High in the mountains, a yellow-bellied marmot whistles a warning as a golden eagle soars above. Searching for insect larvae, a black bear rips into a rotten lodgepole pine log. On the valley floor, a herd of bison graze as a coyote trots through the sagebrush, looking for a meal. Along the Snake River, an osprey dives into the water with talons extended, rising with a cutthroat trout. In a nearby meadow, a moose browses the tender buds of willows that grow in this water-rich environment.

Animals relate to and shape the environment in which they survive; they are also interconnected. Some of these relationships are obvious, while others are much less so. These relationships and connections cross park boundaries. Grand Teton National Park's 310,000 acres lie at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem encompasses over twenty million acres and is considered one of the few remaining, nearly intact, temperate ecosystems on Earth. The animals inhabiting Grand Teton National Park depend on this vast area for survival, residing in and migrating to different areas depending on the season.

Park Fees

The entrance fee is $25 for a private, noncommercial vehicle; $20 for each snowmobile or motorcycle; or $12 for each visitor 16 and older entering by foot, bike, ski, snowcoach, etc. This fee provides the visitor with a 7-day entrance permit for both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Remember to keep your admission receipt in order to re-enter the parks. Snowmobile operators must possess a valid driver's license and are allowed by commercially-guided trip only.

Park Annual Pass

The $50 park annual pass provides entrance to pass holder and accompanying passengers in a single private non-commercial vehicle at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Pass is valid for one year through the MONTH of purchase. Purchase your pass at one of the park's entrances.

Teton Backcountry Guides
1110 Alta North Rd Alta WY 83414
307.353.2900

tetonbackcountryguides.com/
skiyurts@yahoo.com
Grand Teton Hiking and Backpacking Tours

Join us this summer for an active hiking vacation in the Grand Tetons. We offer backcountry day hikes and backpacking trips catered to your interests and activity level.

Teton Backcountry Guides specializes in small group hiking tours and backpacking trips in the Jedediah Smith Wilderness, crossing through Grand Teton National Park. We provide all the equipment necessary for an overnight stay in the mountains. Clients simply bring their personal clothing and we take care of all the rest. We pride ourselves on offering top of the line equipment and tasty, healthy meals. With over twenty years of professional backcountry guiding, we have the experience it takes to offer memorable, educational and fun backcountry travel. Your safety, comfort and enjoyment are always our main concerns. Feel the stress of everyday life melt away as you hike through the peaceful and spectacular Grand Tetons of Wyoming while learning the skills necessary for an overnight adventure in the mountains.
Teton Hiking Trails
TetonHikingTrails.com is the most comprehensive site on the internet for hiking trails in Grand Teton National Park. We provide detailed information on more than 40 hikes in the Grand Tetons, including trail descriptions, key features, pictures, trail length, difficulty ratings, elevation profiles and trail maps. We also offer maps and books related to hiking, history and travel in the surrounding region
Yellowstone National Park
World's Largest Collection of Geysers

It's a Wonderland. Old Faithful and the majority of the world's geysers are preserved here. They are the main reason the park was established in 1872 as America's first national park—an idea that spread worldwide. A mountain wildland, home to grizzly bears, wolves, and herds of bison and elk, the park is the core of one of the last, nearly intact, natural ecosystems in the Earth’s temperate zone.

Summer season is usually from mid-April to early November depending on the weather. Most roads are open to wheeled vehicles exceptions for weather and construction. In the winter season, most roads are open only for snowmobiles and snowcoaches except the road between the North and the Northeast Entrance which is open year-round.

Wildlife

Yellowstone's abundant and diverse wildlife are as famous as its geysers. There are 67 species of mammals including 7 species of native ungulates and 2 species of bears, nearly 300 species of birds, 16 species of fish, 4 species of amphibians, and 5 species of reptiles.

Park Fees

The entrance fee is $25 for a private, noncommercial vehicle; $20 for each snowmobile or motorcycle; or $12 for each visitor 16 and older entering by foot, bike, ski, snowcoach, etc. This fee provides the visitor with a 7-day entrance permit for both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Remember to keep your admission receipt in order to re-enter the parks. Snowmobile operators must possess a valid driver's license and are allowed by commercially-guided trip only.

Park Annual Pass

The $50 park annual pass provides entrance to pass holder and accompanying passengers in a single private non-commercial vehicle at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Pass is valid for one year through the MONTH of purchase. Purchase your pass at one of the park's entrances.

Grand Teton National Park

Mountains of the Imagination

Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.

Animals

It seems that wildlife is never far away in Grand Teton National Park. High in the mountains, a yellow-bellied marmot whistles a warning as a golden eagle soars above. Searching for insect larvae, a black bear rips into a rotten lodgepole pine log. On the valley floor, a herd of bison graze as a coyote trots through the sagebrush, looking for a meal. Along the Snake River, an osprey dives into the water with talons extended, rising with a cutthroat trout. In a nearby meadow, a moose browses the tender buds of willows that grow in this water-rich environment.

Animals relate to and shape the environment in which they survive; they are also interconnected. Some of these relationships are obvious, while others are much less so. These relationships and connections cross park boundaries. Grand Teton National Park's 310,000 acres lie at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem encompasses over twenty million acres and is considered one of the few remaining, nearly intact, temperate ecosystems on Earth. The animals inhabiting Grand Teton National Park depend on this vast area for survival, residing in and migrating to different areas depending on the season.

Park Fees

The entrance fee is $25 for a private, noncommercial vehicle; $20 for each snowmobile or motorcycle; or $12 for each visitor 16 and older entering by foot, bike, ski, snowcoach, etc. This fee provides the visitor with a 7-day entrance permit for both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Remember to keep your admission receipt in order to re-enter the parks. Snowmobile operators must possess a valid driver's license and are allowed by commercially-guided trip only.

Park Annual Pass

The $50 park annual pass provides entrance to pass holder and accompanying passengers in a single private non-commercial vehicle at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Pass is valid for one year through the MONTH of purchase. Purchase your pass at one of the park's entrances.

Mountain Mike Tours

307.774.1000


Facebook
100 percent private tours through Yellowstone and Teton National Parks, with all guides having 40+ years of wildlife experience.
Yellowstone National Park
World's Largest Collection of Geysers

It's a Wonderland. Old Faithful and the majority of the world's geysers are preserved here. They are the main reason the park was established in 1872 as America's first national park—an idea that spread worldwide. A mountain wildland, home to grizzly bears, wolves, and herds of bison and elk, the park is the core of one of the last, nearly intact, natural ecosystems in the Earth’s temperate zone.

Summer season is usually from mid-April to early November depending on the weather. Most roads are open to wheeled vehicles exceptions for weather and construction. In the winter season, most roads are open only for snowmobiles and snowcoaches except the road between the North and the Northeast Entrance which is open year-round.

Wildlife

Yellowstone's abundant and diverse wildlife are as famous as its geysers. There are 67 species of mammals including 7 species of native ungulates and 2 species of bears, nearly 300 species of birds, 16 species of fish, 4 species of amphibians, and 5 species of reptiles.

Park Fees

The entrance fee is $25 for a private, noncommercial vehicle; $20 for each snowmobile or motorcycle; or $12 for each visitor 16 and older entering by foot, bike, ski, snowcoach, etc. This fee provides the visitor with a 7-day entrance permit for both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Remember to keep your admission receipt in order to re-enter the parks. Snowmobile operators must possess a valid driver's license and are allowed by commercially-guided trip only.

Park Annual Pass

The $50 park annual pass provides entrance to pass holder and accompanying passengers in a single private non-commercial vehicle at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Pass is valid for one year through the MONTH of purchase. Purchase your pass at one of the park's entrances.

Darby Wind Cave




Darby Wind Cave is 2.6 miles from the trailhead and is a 1,800 feet elevation gain; it lies at 8,940 feet The Wind Cave snakes through the Darby Formation, a thick layer of 350 million year-old dolomite. A flashlight for the cave is a definite must. The hike to the Darby Wind Cave can be done in just a little over two hours. But once you arrive, you may spend hours crawling through the wind cave, which goes from hundreds of feet high at the entrance to merely a crawlspace farther in. For the more adventurous the Darby Canyon Ice Cave is only another mile up the trail, but don°t attempt the Ice Cave unless you have technical ice climbing knowledge.

Getting There

The trailhead is located about 20 minutes outside the town of Driggs. It is very easy to miss Darby Road turnoff from Highway 33, three miles south of Driggs ID; the turn off is just south of the Spud Theater. Drive several miles up the canyon till you see the trailhead.

Grand Targhee Resort

Grand Targhee Summer Camp

On-site camp program, based in the Grand Targhee Kids Club Grand Targhee Summer Camps are designed to keep your children active and learning this summer. There will be weekly themes, and throughout each day there will be activities such as swimming, biking, horseback riding, arts and crafts, music, chair lift rides, Euro-Bungy, climbing wall, hiking, Gheecology (nature study of Grand Targhee), group games and more. Sign up for daily or weekly camps. Camps are 9:00am to 4:30pm. Free daily shuttle service from the Driggs City Center. Groups Coyotes, Ages 5-8, & Wolves, Ages 9-12

Biking will be Monday, Wednesday, and Fridays. Horseback riding will be Tuesdays and Thursdays. Advance Reservations are suggested 307.353.2300 x 1 for additional info and reservations. More Information

Table Rock Christian School
1510 N. 33 Highway Driggs ID 83422
208.354.9674

trcs.us/
Our vision is to provide Traditional Christian Education, beginning with grades K – 4th in the Autumn of 2013; adding a grade consecutively each year as our Lord leads. We offer a very unique program with a focus on training the heart and mind through: Encouraging critical thinking, logic, investigation, reflection, and nurturing the intellect. Utilizing God’s word and its principles as our guide for moral conduct and truth. Fostering healthy relationships with others and with God. Offering first-hand exposure to great and noble ideas through books in each core subject and through art, music and poetry using “Living Books” that make the subject come alive. Habit training. Small class >size. A peaceful atmosphere.
Teton Aviation Center & War Birds Cafe
253 Warbird Lane Driggs ID 83422
208-354-3100

www.tetonaviation.com
info@tetonaviation.com
A must do is a trip to the museum at the Teton Aviation Center. They have a large selection of Warbirds on display.
Teton County Fair Board
2015 Fair is August 3 - 8th

Monthly meetings are held the 2nd Wednesday of the month. 7:00pm in the 1st floor meeting room of the Teton County Courthouse.
Teton Science Schools
700 Coyote Canyon Road Jackons Wy 83001
307.733.1313

www.tetonscience.org/
info@tetonscience.org
TSS is an organization in northwest Wyoming and Idaho comprised of seven program areas sharing a common vision of education. We have been teaching about the natural world and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem since 1967. TSS is deeply rooted in the outdoors as place anchors and enriches our understanding of the world. Our organization has educated, trained and inspired thousands of children, youth and adults, bringing them together through the study of nature and place-based education. We serve students from across Wyoming, the Intermountain West, the nation and around the world.
Teton Valley Balloon Rally, LLP

July 2 - 5, 2015

Come see Teton Valley Summer Festivals Annual Balloon Festival. Come see pilots set up the balloons and also fly using the oldest successful human flight technology. Balloon rides are also available. This year only, offering free parking to spectators! Spectators of all sizes are welcome! Event Schedule

Teton Valley Regional Land Trust




Birding in Teton Valley

May 29, 2015 - Birding in Teton Valley Join Teton Regional Land Trust Resource Specialist Bill Dell’Isola for an early morning search for birds and their songs in Teton Valley. Look and listen as you tour a conservation easement property in Teton Basin.The tour begins at 6:30 am. RSVP by May 22. Great for children.

Trout Spawning Tour

Witness imperiled Yellowstone cutthroat trout as they spawn in Teton Valley spring creeks. Guides Bill Dell’Isola from Teton Regional Land Trust and Mike Lien from Friends of the Teton River will explain the importance of the fishery and cutthroat biology as you experience this once-ayear event. RSVP by June 5. Great for children. TetonLandTrust.org

Island Park Wildflower & Plant Walk

July 6, 2015 - Join Teton Regional Land Trust and Rose Lehman, botanist with the USDA Forest Service, in a search for beautiful plants and wildflowers. Beginning at 9 am, the tour will highlight Island Park’s diverse plant populations. RSVP by June 29. Great for children. TetonLandTrust.org

An Evening with Sandhill Cranes

September 25, 2015 - Help Teton Regional Land Trust celebrate the migration of Sandhill cranes through Teton Valley. Learn about the history and habits of Sandhill cranes, then travel to one of several viewing sites throughout the area. RSVP by September 18. Great for children.TetonLandTrust.org
Teton Valley Rodeo
1413 ID-33 Driggs ID 83422


www.tetonvalleyrodeo.com/
Facebook
When visiting the West - or even if you live here - catching a summer rodeo is a must-do, and there's no better place to embrace your inner cowboy or cowgirl than at the Teton Valley Rodeo.

Conveniently situated in close proximity to Jackson Hole, Yellowstone, and Grand Teton National Park, the Teton Valley Rodeo makes for an ideal stop on the travel itinerary. The whole family can get up-close-and-personal with the rodeo action, all while drinking in the majestic secnery of the breathtaking peaks of the Tetons, bathed in the rays of a pink, summer sunset.

There's something for everyone at the Teton Valley Rodeo: food, fun, and entertainment for the whole family. You won't find a more authentic western experience than this. It's plain, good, old-fashioned fun, laid-back, and value-packed!

Git your tickets, sit back, relax, and let's rodeo!
The Local Galleria
25 South Main Street Driggs ID 83422
208.270.0833

www.tetonvalleylocalart.com/
The Local Galleria offers classes for all ages. You'll find a different class each day of the week from spray paint, jewelry making, arts & crafts, water color, and more.
Victor Emporium
45 S Main St Victor ID 83455
208-787-2221


Facebook
emporium@silverstar.com
After a day on the trails or exploring the Valley, take the kids to the Victor Emporium for one of their world famous huckleberry shakes! This will be a staple on any trip to Teton Valley!
City Pass
The City Pass Mantra: Experience a city’s top attractions while saving up to half off the cost of admission.

City Pass was established in 1997 by co-founders Mike Gallagher and Mike Morey. Their respective backgrounds in destination marketing and tourism industry research armed them with insight into how travelers want to experience a destination: without a lot of fuss and at significant savings.

Launched first in Seattle and San Francisco, City Pass bundles prepaid admission to each city’s top attractions – based on annual attendance – into one easy-to-use CityPASS ticket booklet whose cost is up to half off what it would cost to purchase those same admissions separately. And, because City Pass limits the number of attractions on each city’s pass to five or six of the most popular sights, visitors have ample time to enjoy a destination, never feeling the need to rush frantically from attraction to attraction to get their money’s worth.

An immediate hit, City Pass now offers products in 11 North American destinations: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, New York City, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Seattle, Southern California, Tampa Bay and Toronto. More than a million happy travelers use CityPASS booklets and cards each year!

But all this growth hasn’t changed City Pass’s commitment to quality and service. In fact, City Pass enjoys a 97 percent customer approval rating. Still family-owned and operated, City Pass, Inc. is headquartered in the small mountain town of Victor, Idaho.
Darby Wind Cave




Darby Wind Cave is 2.6 miles from the trailhead and is a 1,800 feet elevation gain; it lies at 8,940 feet The Wind Cave snakes through the Darby Formation, a thick layer of 350 million year-old dolomite. A flashlight for the cave is a definite must. The hike to the Darby Wind Cave can be done in just a little over two hours. But once you arrive, you may spend hours crawling through the wind cave, which goes from hundreds of feet high at the entrance to merely a crawlspace farther in. For the more adventurous the Darby Canyon Ice Cave is only another mile up the trail, but don°t attempt the Ice Cave unless you have technical ice climbing knowledge.

Getting There

The trailhead is located about 20 minutes outside the town of Driggs. It is very easy to miss Darby Road turnoff from Highway 33, three miles south of Driggs ID; the turn off is just south of the Spud Theater. Drive several miles up the canyon till you see the trailhead.

Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce
112 Center St Jackson WY 83001
307-733-3316

www.jacksonholechamber.com/visit/
info@jacksonholechamber.com
The Jackson Hole Explorer will meet your planning needs and generates excitement for your next trip to Jackson Hole!
Lower Mesa Falls




Not far off Highway 47 beyond Ashton in the Targhee National Forest, on the Mesa Falls Scenic Byway, you can hear the thunder of both Upper and Lower Mesa Falls. Two spectacular waterfalls on the Henrys Fork of the Snake River. Paved parking and paths, accessible restrooms, boardwalks and viewing platforms at Upper Mesa Falls enhance the site for the visitor. Viewing of Lower Mesa Falls is from Grandview Campground and Overlook. In winter the road is closed by snow and groomed for snowmobiling and Nordic skiing. Mesa Falls day pass can also be used at Harriman State Park and Henry's Lake State Park on the day of purchase.

Fees

$5 per car, $1 motorcycle or bike, $25 tour bus. The new Federal Lands Annual Pass, Senior Pass & Access Pass are honored, as well as the Golden Age/Access passports are still honored.

South Teton Creek Canyon / Alaska Basin Trail




From the trailhead at South Teton Creek you enter the South Teton Canyon/ Alaska Basin Trail in a forested area right by South Teton Creek but you soon break out into open meadow terrain that compliments the surroundings groves of conifer and aspen all dwarfed by the cliff bands and peaks of this gorgeous glacial valley. The hiking is easy in the lower canyon and in spring and early summer there are numerous waterfalls. South Teton Creek Trail is in the Jedidiah Smith Wilderness and so all access is by foot or by horseback.

After about 2.7 miles you come to the Devil°s Stairs trail that breaks off to the right, If you choose to hike the Devil°s Stars Trail from the fork it is about 4.5 miles to Mt. Meek Pass which drops you down onto the Death Canyon Shelf. A sign warns that livestock is not recommended on the Devil°s Stairs Trail. From the Devil°s Stairs trail fork it is another 5 miles to Alaska Basin. From here you enter a more forested area and the trail steepens, you start to encounter intermittent sets of practice switchbacks a warning of what is to come latter. The forest opens up regularly to reveal the cliffs above. This stretch reveals much of its glacial past because of the large areas of smooth rock polished by the glaciers that once scoured these valleys. The forest thins as you gain altitude and is relatively sparse by the time you reach Alaska Basin elevation 9,500 feet. This is a high alpine area that resembles the open tundra regions of Alaska. A group of small lakes can be found here called Basin Lakes.

Around the rim above Alaska Basin you will find Mt. Meek named after a mountain man of the region during the early 1800°s. You will also be able to view 11,938-foot Buck Mountain and Jedidiah Smith Mountain but towering above them all is the 12.514-foot South Teton, Alaska Basin is one of those magical places in the backcountry where you wish you would have to never leave.

If you wanted to do a loop trail the Devils Stairs Trail can provide you one, when you get to the Teton Crest Trail go south climb the Sheep Steps and after a while the Devils Stairs trail loops to the west and comes out at the Devils Stairs junction 2.7 miles from the South Teton/Alaska Basin trailhead, of course you could do that in reverse.

Getting There

From Driggs Idaho drive 6.3 miles up Ski Hill Road you pass through the town of Alta WY then after about a mile you turn right up Teton Canyon Road, go a little more than 4 miles, where you will cross two bridges that are close together and are single lane, just before you get to the trail head.

Teton Hiking Trails
TetonHikingTrails.com is the most comprehensive site on the internet for hiking trails in Grand Teton National Park. We provide detailed information on more than 40 hikes in the Grand Tetons, including trail descriptions, key features, pictures, trail length, difficulty ratings, elevation profiles and trail maps. We also offer maps and books related to hiking, history and travel in the surrounding region
Teton River Float




Bates Bridge to Packsaddle Bridge

The float from Bates Bridge to Packsaddle Bridge, for example, could take anywhere from 2-3 hours depending on water flow. Either a paddle board, tube or small craft is great for this easy float. Visit TetonWater.org for more information on the Teton River.

What to Bring on the Teton River

The Teton doesn't require much equipment to navigate it, but there are a few essentials you should remember for every trip. They are:

  • Personal flotation devices (required by law)
  • Sunscreen
  • Bug spray
  • Drinking water
  • Oars or paddles for your watercraft
As the river winds its way north it offers floaters spectacular views of the Tetons, and travelers usually like to have a camera handy.

Wildlife on the Teton River

Moose are known to spend their days along the banks and even in the Teton River. Always be aware of your surroundings, and never antagonize a moose. If a moose is in your floating path in the river, approach it with caution and consider waiting for the moose to leave the water on its own before you pass.

A variety of birds also call the banks of the Teton home. These include cranes, sparrows, sandpipers, ducks and owls.

River Etiquette

Be courteous of other floaters and fisherman as you pass them on your trip. Keep noise to a minimum, as travelers generally head to the Teton for the serenity of nature. Practice Leave No Trace and clean up after yourself and your party. Be cautious and respectful of wildlife and, if you have a dog with you, bring a leash in case it is needed. Never allow your dog to approach wildlife.

Float trips down the Teton River can be fun for the whole family. Planning your trip ahead of time will ensure that you know where you're going and that you have the necessary items with you for the ride.

Teton Valley Rodeo
1413 ID-33 Driggs ID 83422


www.tetonvalleyrodeo.com/
Facebook
When visiting the West - or even if you live here - catching a summer rodeo is a must-do, and there's no better place to embrace your inner cowboy or cowgirl than at the Teton Valley Rodeo.

Conveniently situated in close proximity to Jackson Hole, Yellowstone, and Grand Teton National Park, the Teton Valley Rodeo makes for an ideal stop on the travel itinerary. The whole family can get up-close-and-personal with the rodeo action, all while drinking in the majestic secnery of the breathtaking peaks of the Tetons, bathed in the rays of a pink, summer sunset.

There's something for everyone at the Teton Valley Rodeo: food, fun, and entertainment for the whole family. You won't find a more authentic western experience than this. It's plain, good, old-fashioned fun, laid-back, and value-packed!

Git your tickets, sit back, relax, and let's rodeo!