Teton Valley Idaho

Experience the Culture, Heritage, Food, Art, Geology, & Music

Teton Geotourism Center

Begin your journey at the world's first Geotourism Center located in Driggs, Idaho, your portal for your journey on the Teton Scenic Byway, located within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. This Byway will take you through a magnificent expanse of rolling hills of farmland with the Teton Mountain Range as your backdrop on your way to Yellowstone National Park or Jackson, Wyoming, and Grand Teton National Park.

The Teton Geotourism Center is the beginning to your adventure - an introductory 'sample' to all that awaits you along the Teton Scenic Byway through interactive exhibits and displays showcasing the area's spectacular resources. And, we are your resource for trip planning as you navigate your way along our paths and roads.

Visit

Mon, Tue, Thur 10:00am - 4:00pm
Fri & Sat 10:00am - 4:00pm
Sunday 12:00pm - 4:00pm

Discovering Teton Valley



Make a day to visit Grand Teton National Park in a geological “gold mine” of adventure. Take the Mesa Falls Scenic Byway trip to Ashton and on Idaho 32, along the western side of the Teton Range. The mountains sharply contrast with rolling fields of wheat and canola in these agricultural communities as this trip through the backcountry of Idaho takes you to the Teton Scenic Byway. If you have time, travel on Idaho 31 through the beautiful Pine Creek pass to Swan Valley or just continue on Idaho 33. You will then be driving the incredible Teton Pass and drop down into the Jackson Valley with Jackson Hole, Wyoming and on to Grand Teton National Park. At nearly 10 million years young, the Tetons are the newest mountains in the Rockies. In fact, they continue to grow today at a pace of about an inch every hundred years. The distance from the south entrance of Yellowstone National Park to the south boundary of Grand Teton National Park is 56 miles; approximate driving time with stops is 1-1/2 hours. There are three visitor centers for you to stop and get information. Be sure to visit the Jenny Lake area taking the one way drive and enjoy a scenic boat cruise over Jenny Lake and then a half mile hike to Hidden Falls. Take a horseback ride at Colter Bay and stop by the Visitor Center & Indian Arts Museum. Among these items there are many self-guided trails around the park as well as hiking and mountaineering. Always watch for wildlife as Grand Teton National Park is home to moose, bison, elk, mule deer, pronghorn, black and grizzly bears and a host of other animals and birds. Stop in at the Teton Geotoruism Center for an hands on experience of the Grand Teton Scenic Byway.
Teton Valley is full of amazing artists and our culture is rich in history. During the summer months you'll find great festivals and a monthly art walk through downtown Driggs.

A trip to the Teton Geotourism Center will take you through the ages of Teton Valley Idaho. You enjoy a close up, hands on experience, with displays that showcase the valley's history and adventures. At the Geotourism Center (TGC), you will be transported into our region through an interactive exhibit gallery introducing you to the area through captivating wall-sized murals painted by local artists and audio-visual and interpretive displays. Staff is available to answer questions, guide you through the exhibits, assist with your itineraries and provide maps and brochures of the region. The TGC and gift shop are open daily, and our welcome lobby provides 24-hour traveler services, including free Wi-Fi.

Trekking Photography

Josh Myers/Trekking Photography is an international award winning and published photographer based in Victor Idaho. His freelance work offers a glimpse into backcountry wildlife, landscapes, and experiences. He enjoys capturing “perfect timing,” photos that help create the bigger picture for various publications throughout the US and in England. His awards include Silver winner Best Photographer “Best of Jackson Hole 2014”.

1st place Idaho Press Club “Photo Essay”
1st place Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival
1st place Sierra Clubs photography competition
Awarded “Your Shot” National Geographic
Hall of Fame with Outdoor Photographer Magazine
Honorable Mention Outdoor Photographer Magazine

Teton Arts Council

Teton Valley is home to hundreds of professional and recreational artists such as painters, carvers, sculptors, glass blowers, musicians, actresses and actors, film makers and photographers. The community of artists enjoy creating and sharing their works of art. The Teton Arts Council provides classes for everyone interested in learning and cultural events for everyone at all ages.

Since 1994, the Artists of Teton Valley have celebrated our cultural lifestyle through visual and performing arts. Teton Arts Council hosts classes, workshops, art competitions, and master demonstrations. TAC supports arts throughout the community, throughout the year.
At the Geotourism Center (TGC), you will be transported into our region through an interactive exhibit gallery introducing you to the area through captivating wall-sized murals painted by local artists and audio-visual and interpretive displays. We have staff available to answer questions, guide you through the exhibits, assist with your itineraries and provide maps and brochures of the region. The TGC and gift shop are open daily, and our welcome lobby provides 24-hour traveler services, including free Wi-Fi.

You will discover at the TGC how to make the most of your visit and to “See it like a Local.” We are your resource for planning your trip, booking activities, finding lodging and directing you to local businesses and restaurants. We hope that you will enjoy the true spirit, heritage and natural beauty of our spectacular area.

The Teton Geotourism Center is in the center of Driggs at 60 S. Main Street. You can reach the Center by traveling along Highway 33, on the Teton Scenic Byway, which is part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and forms the western portion of the Yellowstone and Grand Teton Loop Road (a circuit serving both Yellowstone and Teton National Parks).

Teton Valley is marked by three cycles of volcanic activity that occurred in the last 2.1 million years. The eruptions that took place make Teton Valley a rich environment for plant and animal life.

Teton Valley was initially populated by The Shoshone-Bannock and Northern Paiute Indian tribes before Lewis and Clark made their epic trek across the area in 1805.

Teton Valley has been the site of the annual Rocky Mountain Fur Rendezvous, in 1829 and 1832.[3] At the Rendezvous, trappers from the Rockies would go to sell their furs and traders would come in to provide supplies. Indian tribes such as the Flathead and Nez Perce would also attend the rendezvous. In the summer of 1832, a battle was fought between the trappers, Flatheads and Nez Perce with the Blackfeet Indian Tribe near Victor, Idaho.

In 1834, Pierre-Jean De Smet held the first religious service in the West in Teton Valley.[4] Teton Valley is formally known as Pierre's Hole, named in honor of "le grand Pierre" Tivanitagon, a Hudson's Bay Company trader said to be of Iroquois descent, who was killed in a battle with Blackfoot Indians in 1827.

From 1841 to 1868, over 300,000 whites migrated over the South Pass, about 150 miles south of Teton Valley. The migrations were due to the California Gold Rush of 1849 and the migration of the Mormons to avoid religions persecution. The migrating groups took over lands that belonged to The Bannock, Nez Perce and Blackfeet. The Nez Perce tribe retreated towards Canada only to be captured short of the border.

The completion of the transcontinental railroad and the Homestead Act of 1862 brought many settlers into Teton Valley. Many of the present day inhabitants of Teton Valley are fifth generation descendants of the early settlers.